Love Your Local Band

CROOKED ROAD CÉILÍ

LYLBAnyone that thinks traditional Irish music is an archaic, boring experience needs to go to a Crooked Road Céilí show. It’s a lively affair filled with wild abandonment.

“When you get the dancers meshing with the vibe of what the band is doing, you got the pulse going, and the room goes electric. It’s just fabulous. There’s smiles and hollers, and it’s just absolutely stimulating—and we’ll play for hours,” says hammer dulcimer player Julia Horner.

The members of the band met at O’Flaherty’s Pub in San Jose where a larger open-ended group of musicians would gather to play traditional Irish tunes. The trio, now an official band, writes original tunes, but keeps them in the realm of the classic Celtic style. They are playing the Trout Farm Inn on Saturday, which actually isn’t a typical gig for them—the trio usually sticks to private events or outdoor street corners. But they try not to play just anywhere—they want to play in front of people that appreciate the music.

“I consider us a street band,” Horner says. “We love playing farmers markets, local festivals, and we’re a very dedicated wedding band—customized Irish-inspired weddings.”

The show at the Trout Farm Inn will start with them playing traditional set dancing music, which is kind of like American square dancing. Professional dancers from San Francisco will come down to perform. After that, Crooked Road will do some traditional Céilí dancing songs, which is more like line dancing, and something most people can pick up on quickly without any professional training.

“I don’t think the Trout Farm has experienced anything quite like it. A lot of these folks will just be dancing up a storm. It’s going to be a real spectacle,” Horner says.


INFO: 8 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 31. Trout Farm Inn, 7701 E. Zayante Road, Felton. $5. 335-4317.

Contributor at Good Times |

Aaron is a hard-working freelance writer with a focus on music, art, food, culture and travel. In addition to Good Times, he's a regular contributor to Sacramento News & Review, VIA Magazine and Playboy. When he's not working, he's either backpacking, arguing about music or working on his book about ska. One thing's for sure—he knows more about ska than you.

To Top