Fashion Art Santa Cruz Artwear Contest 2014

Fashionart introWe have a winner!

We received your entries and you – our Good Times readers – have chosen your favorite fashionart design!

Let us just say, the response was TREMENDOUS. Thank you to everyone who took the time to review our fabulous entries and vote! We appreciate your comments below – and if you do a quick – unscientific – tally, you can probably guess who are WINNER is…..(drum roll)


Who knew you could transform red plastic cups and garbage bags into a GORGEOUS runway fashionart gown?

You can catch this year’s winning design at the 9th Annual FashionARTSantaCruz fashion show on Sunday, September 20 at the Civic Auditorium in downtown Santa Cruz. Tickets are on sale now. Find out more at www.fashionartsantacruz.com/tickets.

Our winner’s creation will be the FIRST design to saunter down the runway. The designer also receives DINNER FOR TWO at a local restaurant plus four tickets to FashionARTSantaCruz.

THANK YOU to all the talented, creative, awe-inspiring designers who shared your work of art with us. You have made our contest a success.

Now for a last look at our wonderful entries….


The Entries

Entry #1 

fashionartKathyConroyfashionart KathyConroy3fashionart Kathy Conroy2










Is made from denim jean scraps. The bodice front is made from jean yokes and the back is made from waistbands. The skirt is made from strips of denim.

Entry #2

fashionart KittyPelhamBush1

fashionart KittyPelhamBush2

Is made from used store gift cards and old credit cards. Each circle piece is 1/2 inch wide and punched with a single-punch industrial strength hole punch and then again four times with a smaller size to make holes for the jump rings (that are also wound and cut) that hold the pieces together.~It is inspired by both chain maille construction and flapper style.






Entry #3

fashionart three

The designer upcycled her daughter’s cap and gown to create the fashion you see here. She altered the original gown by changing the dominant color, adding more fabric to the sleeves and  lightweight fabric wrapping and styrofoam to the hat to add height. 








Entry #4 —— WINNER!!

entry4The designer made the skirt out of chicken wire and red plastic cups. She cut the cups in half and wired each half onto the chicken wire frame. The top is made out of black trash bags. It is sewn and pleated with a sewing machine.








Entry #5

fashionart BethMastrudeIndigoDyed

The piece is hand dyed, designed and constructed by the artist. The dye method is called shibori-wrapped. It’s a Japanese traditional method of resist dyeing to create a pattern; it is dipped into an indigo vat several times to create the deep blue, then the fabric is draped to fit the model and the dress is sewed. The kimono pieces are also dyed, including the red silk lining and trim. The fronts, back and sleeves are separately shibori wrapped, dipped into indigo vat, then the pieces are plunged into a blue fiber reactive dye to create the light blue background. The kimono was also draped and fitted to the model, then the piece was constructed. The indigo is plant based and there are indigo plants growing outside the designer’s studio. Late this fall she will be fermenting home grown indigo.



Entry #6

fashionart glenxx

fashionart glenusethis

A show-piece, over-garment made from leather, metal, rivets and chain. Leather pieces are placed between two layers of metal and held together with rivets.







 Entry #7

Oberon Alexander design- front

Oberon Alexander design-back

The artist designed this Egyptian-inspired art/fashion dress with nylon organza and cotton fabric. It also boasts a hand-painted ankh collar and faux-leather partial belt, lace-up back, real sand surrounding the base and silver-painted scarabs made from Sculpy. 






 Entry #8 – Headdresses

fashionart LeahSeidl1

fashionart LeahSeidl1backview

fashionart Leah Seidl4fashionart LeahSeidl3fashionart LeahSeidl2 The Headdresses incorporate upcycled materials and hand-gathered natural seeds into the designs. Many components are from thrift stores and “treasure hunting.” The headdresses and wigs combine braiding, jewelry, chain-work, and creative use of natural materials among other techniques and materials.







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